• Pop!_Planet is still very much under development. Data for the wiki is being sourced from the Arch Linux and Ubuntu wikis, along with a bunch of completely unique content specific to Pop!_OS, and sourcing, converting and updating that content takes time; please be patient. If you can't find what you're looking for here, check the Arch Linux and Ubuntu wikis.
  • Welcome!

    I'll get straight to the point.

    When I started Pop!_Planet, I launched it because I saw a need for a centralized community for Pop!_OS. To be frank, I never expected the level of popularity it has achieved. Over the last year, we have gone from under 50 users, to almost 400 users. That's awesome! However... it also comes with a downside. We are rapidly running out of disk space on our server, and the bandwidth costs go up every month.

    Pop!_Planet is not affiliated with System76 in any way, and is funded completely out of pocket. From day one, I said that I'd never use on-site ads (I hate them as much as you do), so the only monetization we get is through donations. Right now, the donations we receive don't even cover our overhead.

    I know that most users will ignore this message, and that's ok. However, if even a few of our users are willing and able to donate a few dollars to help offset our expenses, it would be greatly appreciated.

    Support Pop!_Planet

    Thank you for your time,

    Dan Griffiths
    Pop!_Planet Founder

Guide Beginner How can I enable the grub menu? Duel-booting with Windows.

Abu Huraira

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I am dual booting Pop!OS with Windows 10. I want to access the grub menu so that during boot I can decide which OS will be boot. It shows a blank screen during boot and by default it starts Pop!OS. How can I enable the grub menu?
 

derpOmattic

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Do you have a legacy installation or UEFI?

[ -d /sys/firmware/efi ] && echo "Installed in UEFI mode" || echo "Installed in Legacy mode"
 

derpOmattic

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Installed in UEFI mode
In UEFI mode, Pop uses systemd boot and kernelstub, which is a far superior way of achieving boot. There are a couple ways to go about what you want, but most people are getting a win by installing rEFInd. It's in Pop's repo, so installation is sudo apt install refind.

Any modifications you would normally configure with GRUB can be done by using kernelstub.
 

grandpa2390

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In UEFI mode, Pop uses systemd boot and kernelstub, which is a far superior way of achieving boot. There are a couple ways to go about what you want, but most people are getting a win by installing rEFInd. It's in Pop's repo, so installation is sudo apt install refind.

Any modifications you would normally configure with GRUB can be done by using kernelstub.
what do you mean it's a superior way of achieving boot? right now I have to hammer f12 and then I have tell the bios which partition is the correct one (and the partition isn't labeled).
 

derpOmattic

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what do you mean it's a superior way of achieving boot? right now I have to hammer f12 and then I have tell the bios which partition is the correct one (and the partition isn't labeled).
If you're genuinely interested in finding out why systemd boot is better than GRUB, I'll be happy to discuss it. Regardless of whether you want to know more or not, you have a UEFI installation and systemd boot with kernelstub is what Pop uses in that instance. If you want a menu that is like the GRUB menu, try rEFInd.
 

grandpa2390

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If you're genuinely interested in finding out why systemd boot is better than GRUB, I'll be happy to discuss it. Regardless of whether you want to know more or not, you have a UEFI installation and systemd boot with kernelstub is what Pop uses in that instance. If you want a menu that is like the GRUB menu, try rEFInd.
I didn't mean my question in a combative manner. I was and am genuinely curious why, and was also hoping that perhaps you'd say something like "if you have to hammer f12 to get to the boot menu, you're doing something wrong." :)
 

derpOmattic

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If you have any specific questions just ask, but here's some general information to get you started. There's a lot of information about systemd and systemd boot online.

A small point of clarity regarding GRUB in Pop!_OS - Pop does have GRUB, but they don't utilize it by default and don't support it. GRUB is only there as a fallback for those people who have older hardware that cannot be updated to use UEFI. Pop is intentionally designed to work with systemd boot, and a lot of engineering goes into integrating it. No work is spent on GRUB due to it being bloated, slow and full of security vulnerabilities. The latest one.

The main benefits of using systemd boot and kernelsub, to my knowledge are;

The main, and most important reason, is it meets the Freedesktop recommendations for using a bootloader with systemd. If that isn't the only thing that needs to be said, I don't know what to tell you. For example, you buy a new car and the manufacturer recommends unleaded petrol, but you want to use diesel. Good luck with that. System76 don't support GRUB , and systemd wasn't designed to use GRUB. The only major projects that are actively trying to follow the specifications for the bootloader of their chosen init system, are Pop!_OS and Solus.

Systemd boot and kernelstub are small and fast! Whereas, I've seen using GRUB described as, "essentially using a whole OS to boot another OS".

It is utilizing systemd boot, along with kernelstub, that makes the unique feature of full-disk-encryption possible. When introduced, it was a "Linux first", or a pioneering step for System76. It is a massive improvement for Linux security and not possible using GRUB.

On every new installation of Pop!_OS, as a preventative measure to ensure GRUB will never mess with systemd boot, I run sudo apt-get purge grub-common. Then sudo apt-mark hold grub-common grub-pc grub-pc-bin grub2-common to prevent updating or reinstalling GRUB.

Most Linux distributions using systemd are strangely using GRUB. Using a bootloader that isn't recommended by the software you're choosing to use as an init system doesn't make much sense. The only reason I can see for the choice is familiarity, which isn't a good reason, and often holds technology back. When all the projects who utilize systemd get on board with using systemd boot, the conflicting bootloader issues in Linux will cease. At that time, it will be a simple matter of using the BIOS EFI boot menu to select out of every entry. No GRUB, NO rEFInd needed.
 
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glantucan

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Just for those interested and also to check with more informed contributors if what I describe here is right.

I have two systems both in UEFI mode and both with widows 10 installed before I installed Pop!_OS 20.04.
  • Laptop PC: Installed Pop!_OS on the same drive as windows, had to do some manual partitioning. Systemd boot loader didn't detect windows automatically, but that's ok.
  • Desktop PC: Installed Pop!_OS on a new drive, just let the installer partition the disk automatically. Systemd boot loader didn't detect windows automatically, but that's ok too.
The reason it's ok is because you can always use your firmware boot manager to choose what partition to boot. In both my systems pressing F11 let me choose wat partition to boot. In your it may be a different key but you can look it up.

But for those who like to have boot manu by default, or like me tend to forget what key brings theformware bott menu up there is a very easy way:

If you installed Pop!_OS on the same disk as windows (in UEFI mode) they'll share the same EFI partition. Go to /boot/efi/loader/ and edit your loader.conf to have a timeout, something like this:

Code:
default Pop_OS-current
timeout 5
Then go to /boot/efi/loader/entries/and create a windows.conf file having this entries:
Code:
title Windows 10
efi /EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi
The bootmgfw.efi may be on another location, check it out. Also notice that the path root here refers to the /boot/efi/ folder.

That's it, can't be simpler. Yes you have to edit config files, but there is no magic here, pretty easy to understand.

Now, if you installed Pop!_OS on a different disk than windows, windows and linux will have different EFI partitions (unless there is an option on the pop installer I'm not aware of) but you can follow the same instructions and perform an extra step to succeed:
Just copy the Microsoft folder on the windows disk EFI partition (/EFI/Microsoft) to the /boot/efi/EFI/ folder. Check out the paths match and you are good to go.

Again, no magic involved.

So yes, I do believe systemd boot loader is way better than something you are unable to understand and deal with without some magic tools.

Please correct me if I'm wrong on the instructions
 
Last edited:

derpOmattic

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There's a couple ways to go about it, but the way you outlined that is correct. Nice work, and thank you. For anyone needing a guide on copying the Microsoft bootloader into Pop's EFI, look here. With the time-out in place, you can select what you want. If no time-out is applied you just press the space bar for the menu. For multiple drive systems, you can either use the mother board's EFI menu, or try using a tool like rEFInd. It's in Pop's repo, so installs with apt.
 

mattias

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So I did as @derpOmattic described in this thread and after installning refindit and removing grub, I was nervous to restart... but hey it worked! So happy camper here! Thank you once again!
 
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