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    Pop!_Planet Founder

Question Solved Most recent vs LTS

vargonis

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Feb 28, 2019
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A few months ago I installed Pop_OS! and just went for what seemed the default choice: most recent (it was 18.10 back then). I didn't even know what LTS stood for, and the fact that both link button and version number were smaller shaped my decision. But now I want to use Docker containers with NVIDIA and those can only be installed on 18.04, for the time being. So, I have several questions regarding this:

1) Why is the most recent version the default for Pop!_OS? Looking around, people seem to advise sticking to LTS in the case of Ubuntu.
2) Is there a way to downgrade without losing my data? It doesn't look like, but I'll ask anyways.
3) Somehow off-topic but related in my case: does anyone know how to install nvidia-docker on 18.10? Just trying to install following the 18.04 instructions leads to apt-get complaining like this:

> nvidia-docker2 depends on docker-ce (= 5:18.09.5~3-0~ubuntu-bionic) | docker-ee (= 5:18.09.5~3-0~ubuntu-bionic); however:
> Version of docker-ce on system is 5:18.09.5~3-0~ubuntu-cosmic.
 

derpOmattic

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Good questions vargonis. I'm sure a lot of people would like to know the answers. One of the more advanced users could answer much more succinctly and precisely than me. I think it is worth the wait.
 

7FFY

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Mar 30, 2019
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Most recent version means improvements (e.g the kernel, better gnome DE performance), software versions are also more up to date which is always the best option I think.

LTS versions have becomes a trend in my opinion pushed by youtubers etc, saying that you SHOULD stay on an lts like it is unstable which is false, the only reason I would stay on an LTS would be using software that requires specific versions of dependencies or something like that.
 

darknetmatrix

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Apr 28, 2019
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LTS stands for “long-term support.” LTS releases were originally intended for business users, giving them a stable platform they could install that would be supported with security updates for years.

LTS releases are designed to be stable platforms that you can stick with for a long time. Ubuntu/Pop_Os! guarantees LTS releases will receive security updates and other bug fixes as well as hardware support improvements (in other words, new kernel and X server versions) for five years.

In comparison, a regular release will only be supported for nine months. Considering new versions of Ubuntu/ Pop_OS! are released every six months, you’ll have three months after a new version is released to upgrade to it or you won’t receive security patches anymore. You’ll probably want to upgrade to every LTS version — new LTS versions are released every two years. If you stick with the LTS version, you’ll still get a new Ubuntu/Pop_OS! release every two years.
 

TeamLinux01

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May 5, 2019
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I am also waiting for Docker to provide their software for Disco. I heard you could use the Cosmic Repo (Pop!_OS 18.10) for Docker CE instead on Disco (Pop!_OS 19.04).

I am hoping that System76 really polishes their off-line updater and makes it very easy to upgrade from non-LTS version to the next non-LTS version, as sometimes upgrading with a bunch of PPAs and other sources can break an upgrade.

If you don't mind not having the "latest and greatest" and want your system to just work for years, I recommend sticking with the LTS versions. Since I do a lot of gaming, I will be going with non-LTS versions.
 

derpOmattic

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The reason I didn't answer is the three-part-question. It might be prudent to separate the questions if you still want answers to all. System76 devs always recommend the most recent ISO. LTS is more suited to a corporate structure or if you have specialized software that needs the LTS dependencies.
 

vargonis

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Feb 28, 2019
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Thanks for your answers. I kind of see why most recent is the default, and maybe someone who needs CUDA enabled Docker containers either already knows what LTS is and why stick to it, or will learn it the hard way. It would still be nice to be able to get those easily on Pop!_OS, given the otherwise exceptional support of GPU-related stuff. derpOmattic, you're right about the convenience of separating my questions, but I must say I have vanishing faith on parts (2) and (3) so I don't feel it's worth now (that I have already downgraded, which is most likely the best solution for anyone else who finds herself in the same situation).
 

mmstick

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Dec 15, 2018
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You can use apt repos for older releases. The bionic and cosmic suite of the docker PPA still works on disco.
 

vargonis

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So I could have installed docker-ce as if I was on 18.04, and then nvidia-docker2 wouldn't have complained? That possibility didn't occur to me.
 

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