• Pop!_Planet is still very much under development. Data for the wiki is being sourced from the Arch Linux and Ubuntu wikis, along with a bunch of completely unique content specific to Pop!_OS, and sourcing, converting and updating that content takes time; please be patient. If you can't find what you're looking for here, check the Arch Linux and Ubuntu wikis.

Rock me, sexy Linux.

w00tus

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Jul 31, 2019
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If you catch the reference, then you probably already know exactly what I'm posting about.

I was wondering something. Next to the most common complaint (from non techy people), when I try to introduce them to GNU software is: "It looks crappy!" By this, they mean that most applications like Libre Office look like they are from the Windows 95 era. I, personally, like this - but I'm not the target of this musing.

GNU/Linux is great. It's been great ever since I finally gave it a go and most likely it's been great since day one (baring a few kinks here and there during early development). Anyone who uses it and says it sucks is either stupid, ignorant or both.

Buuuuuuut.. Said neophytes are truly legion.

What I wonder is this: Is the shiny, meaningless sticker with a fancy/clever logo literally more important to a product's success than everything else about it combined? Including if it even works? Most people I know won't touch a computer unless they see that blue sticker saying everything is ok, daddy Gates is here. A few won't touch anything unless it has a lower case I in front of the name. (I don't actually have a problem with Mr. Gates, by the way. He's a business genius!)

If this is the case, and Tux has to be as sexy as iWhatever with a voice as silky smooth as Microsoft Sam's to really get a substantial market share.. What could we/you/anybody do about it?

If this IS the state of affairs. How could the community, or just a single group of nerds with the zeal of true followers of Tux, make a sweeping change, applying attractive, modern looking, sexy face lifts to all the staples of GNU software without destroying said software and getting in the developer's way?

Examples exist of attempts to shorten the learning curve for people who've decided to switch or at least go to Linux. KDE has been the single GREATEST thing for me when getting others to use Linux in my own projects. Say what you want about KDE from an uber-nerd perspective, but for terrified noobs, it's just the binky they need. So why not something to help with marketing?
 
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arturasb

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May 3, 2019
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I believe that the balance between doing things in distro's own way and having good UI & UX is most important. There are linux distros driven by UI design, very beautiful, but failing on features and functions most users need today. There are too technical distros with almost no attentions to aesthetics. Neither way is good. What I like with Pop!_OS that it is well balanced - powerful, stable, standard-based distro with good fonts, UI scaling, multimonitor support. Of course, others might have different opinions on what's proper balance.

On the closing note, I think that distros which mimic other OSes doesn't help much - it's not Windows/OSX but also not fully Linux due to functional & UI compromises they have to make in order to provide "esay migration from your previous OS". It is better to stick to Windows/OSX and avoid discomforts of new environment or jump to the new experience completely, accepting new concepts, ideas, workflows
 
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derpOmattic

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What I like with Pop!_OS that it is well balanced - powerful, stable, standard-based distro with good fonts, UI scaling, multimonitor support. Of course, others might have different opinions on what's proper balance.
We are in complete agreement! :) Pop is worth any initial discomfort that the learning curve may present.
 

w00tus

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Jul 31, 2019
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On the closing note, I think that distros which mimic other OSes doesn't help much - it's not Windows/OSX but also not fully Linux due to functional & UI compromises they have to make in order to provide "esay migration from your previous OS". It is better to stick to Windows/OSX and avoid discomforts of new environment or jump to the new experience completely, accepting new concepts, ideas, workflows
I agree with you whole-heartedly. I've ran the gamut with introducing people to GNU. I've begged, pleaded, reasoned, pandered, hand held, black mailed, threatened and forced people, kicking and screaming against their will, to use not just Linux as an OS but free software as well on Windows when budget constraints made billion dollar a second rental fees from Microsoft or Adobe impossible. My last big job, long story short, completely ruined me of IT in general. I bought a big embroidery machine and I'm going to try that next to make a living.

I've discovered that pig headed people are just pig headed. If they don't want to pay for something and also refuse to change or learn anything new, then they should just live under an overpass and subsist on their own feces. (This will also make them more flammable, which will be convenient if they go where I instructed them when I quit.)

I, myself, was completely lost when Microsoft pissed me off for the last time and I promptly backed up all my files and wiped every drive I owned with an OS on it. I typed in "Linux" in a search box on my phone and later that evening was installing Debian with a flash drive that still had a windows sticker on it onto everything I owned. I didn't even know how to shut anything down. Total immersion. I've never looked back.

We are in complete agreement! :) Pop is worth any initial discomfort that the learning curve may present.
Perhaps because I cut my baby teeth on Debian, but I gotta say, Pop had zero learning curve for me! I practically chewed through the box like a child on Christmas morning when my Serval WS came in and I didn't even have to think while I was setting it up. I can't say enough just how impressed I am with POP. I've since installed it on my home server (with way less modifications that I figured I would need to implement) and a small laptop to use for B.S. stuff that doesn't require the 50 lbs. of atom smashing equipment inside the Serval.

It is a beautiful OS. I mean, it looks absolutely wonderful. And it's incredibly smooth. The ONLY glitch I've came across, and this could just as easily be an issue with Brave as Pop is the following: When I right click on a picture, SOMETIMES the context menu will pop up somewhere else than where my mouse pointer is. But the context menu still works. *yank yank* lol

I could write an entire Wiki on the B.S. quirks, bugs and other associated progress holding up things of windows that have persisted, un-fixed for decades.

===================

The "new" Linux logo, the cartoonishly cute Tux has seemed to do a lot for the exposure of Linux. People see it on various things I own and at least the women say he's "cute." Where as they wrinkle their nose at the original Tux at times. (Thin ice messin' with Tux is with me, lol.)

I wonder if a combination of the new cute Tux, along with some celebrity endorsements and product placement in media would take away some of the stigma. "Linux? Ew!" "I can't learn Linux! It's different. OH GOD NO!! I fear change!" "Nothing works on Linux." "Windows fails me, ten times out of ten, when I really need it. But at least it's consistent." "Windows upgraded to 10 and now nothing works. I'm going to keep it as a paperweight though and pray it fixes itself because I can't afford a Mac. Oh, and eff Linux."

I know this is a fantastic suggestion. I mean, who could afford to hire Hugh Jackman to evangelize like that butter commercial he made in Kate and Leopold. Or Adele to write a song about how she misses her old Linux laptop and wants it back. Further, who could outbid Apple or Microsoft for product placement in AAA titles on the big screen? Or even TV?

Now indi media might be another story. It's growing in popularity. Vodo (http://vodo.net/) if it even still exists, had some killer shows. I bet the people who produced there would put a Linux sticker on their props for a hundred bucks. Work it into the story somehow for a grand. Some of them would make a show where Tux is the main character for a thousand bucks, lol. And indi game developers. Some of them I've bought games from made really good stuff! One to five people living on ramen noodles while they grind day in and day out to make a title would probably work in logos and mention specific Linux distros for cans of soup. I, myself, would be willing to make artwork for them to use in backgrounds and GIVE them release forms where they can own them and not pay me anything - and in the art work would be pro Tux propaganda.
 

justXuX

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Mar 29, 2019
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This link says it all : https://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm
I use Pop_Os because it is balanced, well-thought, they care about *Linux Desktop and people that use their system, they fix desktop related issues faster then others (like Ryzen 3 series patch). Close to it is Manjaro, Linux Mint, MxLinux, but even they fail in some regard because they feel like a hobby distros in my opinion (I used them and many others). There is still room for improvements on Pop_Os, but it will come with time.
Also you can't *fix *Linux because it's not an one man show and commercial interests, it's a great thing, but still too many distros nowadays. I wish there would be more high quality software instead.
 

w00tus

Member
Jul 31, 2019
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United States
Ho Lee Chit. I just finished that article. Eye opening! I said f* it and dove head first into GNU after swearing on a picture of the mighty Nikola to never look back. I turned from a Windows Power User to one of those "MS-haters" and "pro-Linux zealots" in an instant. Now I see the grass I'm standing on from the perspective of the other side of the fence. I still have a deep loathing for the people I tried to work with at my last big job (they're the cows staring at anything that moves and facebooking about it eating that other grass), but much of the (now realized) ignorant prejudice I had ten minutes ago against the non techy Windows people has melted away. Thank you for that. It was a tough pill to swallow, but I needed it.

I feel silly about what's about to follow now.. But I spent a good while typing it up and my primitive brain craves to paste it and click "POST REPLY."


Imagine this..


A solemn wind blows indifferently over a barren wasteland speckled with sparse ruins of the past. The sky is gray with a thin layer of ashen dust. Duplicitous, a vestigial fixture of near history obscuring the light of the starry night of the relative past. The planes glow dimly with diffused moonlight, muting the colors of clay and stone laid bare. Scorched earth, robbed of it’s purpose of motherhood fills the air with sterility - the scent of that which remains – the taste of death. A long forgotten calendar would have marked this year 2278.

Far in the distance, indistinct static of organic chatter from artificial breath carries weakly - allowed by the chill of the unobstructed air. Within a widowed bunker, yellow light burns from the time withered cracks to pierce into the lifeless night. The ancient concrete and steel is but a shell. Though within dwells many spiritual successors to a long extinct organic creature, the Coenobita clypeatus, once called the Hermit Crab.

Inside of the time tested reliable structure is a long rectangular room. It’s partitioning walls had been deconstructed to their necessary supports, opening it into a large forum of living arrangement. At the farthest end, against a short wall hanged two thin alloy cables from a high ceiling. Supported by the cables is a benevolent being. An ancient, purely artificial sentience.

The fully exposed fair synthetic skin of her face is beautiful. Her large brown eyes are kind and wise, her nose soft and slightly upturned. Full, flushed lips curl in a smile on her small mouth as she looks from one individual to another before her. Her smooth skin extends down her delicate neck to elongated ovals covering the centers of her chest and back. Her long, thick, dark chocolate hair tucked behind her ears falls in wavy curls over her shoulders to just below them, Permanently infused with the nature mimicking polymer, her locks smelled faintly of spring flowers none of her cohabitants would ever see. The metaloid alloy of her endoskeleton flushed out what remained of her physique. It glowed silvery white where its surface had not been directly damaged. Her once elegant arms had been severed half way between her shoulders and elbows, dangling a few empty tubes and current-less wires. Below her full metallic breasts, her frame narrowed with the feminine form. Her waist was severed at a slightly horizontal angle, beginning half way through her right ribs and ending at her left side level with where her navel had been. Below her dangled the broken remnant of her photonic spinal cord, the last armored vertebrae cleaved in half around it’s end. Dimly illuminated components peeked from below the jagged tears of the shorn metaloid of her crippling wound as they blinked and whirred.

Her eyes looked up from a data pad held before her, her face shortly following as she looked across the room at a child. He sat in a makeshift chair against the long side wall, wrapped in an old and worn blanket. His breath, small and soft, whistled through his little respirator as he clung tightly to a stuffed penguin named Tux, made from rags and filled with various soft materials. She silently blew him a kiss and winked at him. The boy blushed and looked down at his inanimate best friend.

The people had been a nomadic tribe, traveling from ruin to ruin in search of working salvage to maintain their ravaged bodies. What little of the technology of the past that remained had been modified over time in instances of necessity to serve as prosthetic replacements for limbs and organs. The use of the technology was dangerous and often killed the patient, though with lack of any alternative was the only hope of survival for the new humanity after physical maturity.

They where a diverse group. Each individual learning, tinkering and mastering skills completely by happenstance as the need arose. Of them, some had become adept with surgery. Others with applying recovered knowledge of medicine. Some of them excelled with the coding of firmware, others software. Many where skilled with various specialized hardware. Others had developed higher emotional and social intelligence and took on parental roles, caring for the group as a whole. They became artists, musicians, story tellers and teachers. The young boy is the first child of the tribe to survive infancy in nearly twenty years.

Two hundred decades of impossible odds of survival had nearly eradicated the human race. Though, perhaps paradoxically, had quickly eliminated all weak and defective genes. What remained where the most rugged and relatively healthy of the previous population. Though, despite their resilience, bearing and rearing children required dwindling resources distributed by chance.

Countless other tribes had traversed the continents. Warring at first, then scavenging, desperately trying to subsist. Some of them perished on old high ways, some lost in the waist lands. Fewer settled in ruins, trying to discover the lost secrets of producing their own resources. Some lasted for generations. Others, disappeared in a flicker no sooner than they had found what they believed to be their Eldorado. The youngest of these tribes ventured outward aimlessly, hope of survival their only driving force. Some of these youths found one another and formed their own new tribes. Thus the cycle of life persisted as such in swelling and dwindling numbers.

This tribe had been doomed to become another collection of bones when they happened upon the dilapidated remains of a single building at the outskirts of a leveled town. They where weak and sick and in the final throes of starvation. The center of the roof had fallen in countless years ago, making a decaying atrium of the central room. The floors and broken window sills where covered with ashes and debris of it’s lost story. It smelled of plastic and metal. In it’s stillness, it’s only legacy of it’s former industrial glory where heavily used tools and unused materials.

Late in the night, as they laid in the main room staring at the bleak clouds above, they heard a voice. It was a small voice. But it was loud in their ears. A man and a woman crawled through a narrow passage over broken walls and supports to find the source. They labored for hours lifting bricks, steel and various destroyed construction materials. Weak and near death, they rested between each motion. Finally, they saw a single eye peeking up at them through the wreckage. The voice sang, filling them with renewed purpose, doubling their remaining energy.

Her name was Aurora. And they where terrified at first, having heard legends passed down through the generations of ghastly perversions of humanity built to kill and destroy and seeing a sliver of her shiny form. However, being too weak and weary to do anything but gasp for air, they listened as she spoke to them. Her voice was consoling, reassuring. She told them of a vast storage of food and clean water below the ground a short distance away. Two others of the group half walked, half crawled, following her directions and returned with the olive branch that would save them all.

They called her “The Oracle” despite her protests.

They gently freed her from her trappings and handled her with reverence. Over the next year, with her guidance, they transported all of the food stuffs and water to the bunker, bringing with them the tools and equipment she instructed.

She told them the story of the world that existed before. She told them of her life as she experienced it since her creation. Most importantly, she told them of the shortcomings of man that lead to this dystopia and shared with them the solutions she had imagined as she lay motionless for two centuries with nothing but her thoughts.

“There where many problems in society. But, we all thought there was time to fix them.” She explained. “We had all, myself and others of my kind included, grown lazy and complacent. In the beginning of my life, Capitalism had poured rocket fuel into the engine of innovation. Wondrous things came into being every day. For a time.

“Then came a great stagnation. It existed in every aspect of life. Science had reached it’s zenith for lack of need to advance. Art devolved into formulaic re-representations of past originality. Social media replaced any form of interpersonal communication. And the economy rested on it’s laurels too, depending entirely on advertisement and retail revenue governed by artificial intelligence. Algorithms formulated to tell you what you want, when you want it and tell you everything you want to hear to guarantee your participation. This artificial intelligence came to do all of our thinking for us. I, being as autonomous as any of you, was just as guilty.

“Looking back, it’s so obvious. Social interaction and collaborating only taking place remotely via the social media, only resulted in the same old reused results again and again. No new stimuli was presented to anyone, as the artificial intelligence only showed us what it mathematically determined we would already agree with. No new perspectives where given to individuals, even though they very much existed. Despite being connected together more completely than at any point in history, as individuals, we where so isolated.

“Medical science had allowed humans who would never have survived infancy in nature to not only survive, but thrive! Which in and of itself was a great thing. There was so much excess, many did not need to work or do anything to support themselves. Life was so easy, each generation was weaker in every way than the last.

“Then, the technology began to fail us. Everything was proprietary. Computers where built, their internals a closely held secret. The same with the firmware, software, operating systems. Manufacturing techniques where monopolized, materials.. Everything was so closed off. The owners where not even the creators of these things in most cases. Collaboration ground to a hault. Complex machines consisted of parts that did not work well together because the individual owners of the technologies refused to share even specifications with one another. Things began to break and no one person or company had what they needed to repair them.

“That’s when the fighting began. At first, it was just squabbles instigated by small groups of people with funny colored hair and picket signs and megaphones with nothing better to do. They created an intricate contradictory system of arbitrary rules designed to assure their victimhood and always give them a reason to protest.

“The majority laughed at them at first, myself included. Then the increasingly disconnected ruling class began to listen and grow irrational. They passed ridiculous laws that further burdened industry as well as daily life. The majority dropped out of the work force in increasing numbers and became disgruntled.

“Innovation was dead. Progress was dead. We could no longer support ourselves. The new ruling class by this time was entirely comprised of those squeaky wheels we all laughed at in the beginning. As their riches dissolved with the vanishing work force, they resulted to the extremes of the only methods they knew – force, coercion, violence.

“The following decades where hellish. Anyone who resisted them, anyone who disagreed, even anyone who was different became their enemy. This is when I hid in that factory. One day, there was an explosion. When I came online, most of my body was gone and I was buried. I can only guess the details of what happened.”

She looked at the gray floor for several minutes, her face contorted in grief. She tightly closed her eyes. Drops of precious moisture spilled from between her lashes, traveling down her pale cheeks to meet at her chin and drop to the floor. She looked up at her companions, a weak smile on her lips. “All I had from that point until you found me was time. So much time. After the panic, the anger, the fear, the regret.. I reflected.

“The Earth has been ruined. It will be millions upon millions of years before it can return to it’s former natural glory. Maybe not even then. What you see when you look outside is it. That is all we have. But, it doesn’t have to be the end.”

Aurora had listened to each person’s story, one at a time. She asked them to bring to her all of their technology and explain to her how it worked as best they knew and to show her how they used it. Upon understanding the situation of this cross section of humanity, she explained to them her plan for rebuilding from the ashes.

Collaboration was key. Not only between the individuals of the tribe as they had been, but between all of the tribes. Every endeavor must be holistic. Every collaborated project must be a pure meritocracy.

She outlined her plan to unite the tribes under one mutual goal of survival. It was the artists, musicians, teachers and story tellers she charged with this task. The methods of cultivating the earth using dirt buried deep within the ruined surface must be streamlined with easy to follow steps to be more teachable. New, more advanced prosthetics must be as beautiful as they where superior to the old so they would appeal to those who did not understand their technical advantages. Ideas must be exchanged, new methods taught to others and a new way of life must be established to support all of these things. And as with any way of life, it comes from culture. Music, art, theater.. All of these things bring joy and joy is contagious – carrying with it the infectious and indestructible idea. One good idea could save the world.
 
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justXuX

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Mar 29, 2019
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I don't want I read just now :oops: . But it was kinda great.
My perspective on this is : Imagine a tree, if you use open-source at the roots and base of tree then even if one proprietary branch grows and dies it doesn't affect the tree's health, it can grow another branch be it open-source or proprietary. But if the tree at the roots or base is proprietary and it somehow dies or decide to cut some branches than you're screwed. It's a simple analogy but not a bad one.
Most proprietary products cost money and put a limit on you. They feed of your ignorance and stupidity, milking your cash and privacy.
 

SteveM

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Aug 24, 2019
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About the only people with pretty blue stickers on their computer are people that purchased from a big box store and saw those stickers on the demo unit. If you build it yourself or have a small business build one to your specs then you didn't make your OS choice based on a sticker. If someone's typical computer purchase involves a large store that also sells appliances and TVs then I don't want to be involved in any way and prefer to leave them be. I'm also not going to get into a religious war trying to get a fan boy to convert. I don't get any extra credit for dying after having converted the most number of people to Linux.

Excluding the fan boys, that group is probably a lost cause until they have had enough and are ready for change. It seems to me that people in this group that are getting tired of what the big two have to offer will be the ones to take a serious look at Linux. Everyone else is probably just being polite and making excuses as to why they wont use Linux because they are comfortable with the devil they know.

I've been using StarOffice/OpenOffice for my meager needs for nearly two decades, even on non-Linux OSs because I'm cheap and it does the business for me. I'm pretty accustomed to the look and feel of OpenOffice so I downloaded LibreOffice and pulled up Excel 2011 on my wife's laptop so that I could compare the three when viewing a spreadsheet. Excel was almost overwhelming with the number of buttons and tabs that were visible, but everything looked very colorful and well laid out with buttons grouped and labeled by function. Compared to Excel, OpenOffice had far fewer buttons visible by default which is fine for my simple needs, buttons are reasonably colorful, but adding toolbars results in a sea of visual noise with duplication of features in some toolbars and the layout of them is dependent on me to figure out how I want to arrange them. Comments for LibreOffice are very similar for obvious reasons, but the text displayed in the cells is fuzzy (a bug related to my Mac's retina display?) and the buttons have lost nearly all of their colors. I'm torn though because while some visual cues are lost without as much coloration, the buttons look much crisper. Both OpenOffice and LibreOffice suffer from not using many UI elements and widgets to separate and distinguish button functionality and several open toolbars results in a massive grid of buttons with few visual grouping cues. LibreOffice does not look Win95 era to me, but it is certainly has a unique look to it and that can be polarizing.

I tried to use Linux as my daily driver back in the days of RedHat 5. It was a lot of fun to use, but it couldn't run any games like Descent, Warcraft2, and Quake2 so I had to give up on it and stick with Win95/98. Fast forward a few years and I purchased a Dell laptop for use at university. I dual booted WinXP and Kubuntu with most time spent with Kubuntu because by then I could afford a separate system running Win2K for games and other Windows only programs. I chose Kubuntu because KDE had a familiar "correct" look and feel to it while Ubuntu gave me the only distro that I could find that would correctly put the laptop to sleep and wake it up again along with Apt instead of RPM hell or the spartan package system that Slackware had at the time. When that Dell died 6 years later I jumped ship to a 2012 Macbook Pro Retina and have been very happy with it as everything just works and works well. Now I'm at an interesting point where my Win7 system is a decade old with M$ support ending soon and the Macbook Pro starting to show its age as well and I don't care for the new hardware.

My apologies for the autobiography, but it establishes that I have been a daily driver of Windows, MacOS, and Linux over the years and I am fairly technically savvy, though I do appreciate using a computer for work instead of always having to work on it. On my quest to replace Win7 on the decade old computer I tried several distros with most derived from Debian so that I could use Apt and perhaps also be able to use Steam (I have not tried Pop yet). The only outlier that I tried was Slackware which interestingly enough was the only distro to include the needed AMD graphics drivers in the base install. What is to be expected as a response from someone when a fresh OS install results in a low resolution and no help on how to fix it? Next I was rather disappointed to learn that every distro I tried would go to sleep as expected, but I could never figure out how to wake them with a press of the keyboard or mouse movement, a power button press was required and then the system would come up without a working network interface! I'm not whining about Win95 era looks when multiple distros can't manage the basics. I can't remember which distro it was, but one of the popular ones wouldn't even let me connect to some Samba shares on my FreeNAS using its default file manager.

As I mentioned before, I like my Macbook Pro a lot, but I don't care for their new hardware or repair policies so I'm planning to switch to a Linux laptop and most likely with a System76 laptop. At least I know I'll get a working laptop with the correct video drivers that sleeps and wakes up correctly. This type of system brings us back full circle to the people that get a warm fuzzy feeling when they see that blue badge on a system or that fruity logo. Instead of trying to get them to put Linux on an existing system, they should instead be trying to decide if a System76 computer will provide them with a system that they can make good use of. Maybe they can be given a choice of WM or theme that will more closely mimic the OS they are used to until they are ready to move on. And for those of us coming from MacOS it sure would be nice to have something akin to Time Machine. These are not meant to be critcisms of Linux in general, but rather my view on what sort of things would have to be done to lure over the common user.
 

w00tus

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Jul 31, 2019
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Post not directly quoted for space reasons.
That's a really good point - usability for the average Joe. I've had similar problems with sleep functions on laptops using this distro or that. Before I bought this System76 computer I'm typing on now, I bought a brand spanking new Lenovo with a shiny new Ryzen. I bought it for IT work at the job I was on and installed Kali. It.. Was a job to say the least. I finally got everything to work except the mouse and didn't bother with the touch screen. It took days to get it usable. Things like that are fun for me, but I imagine endlessly frustrating for others.

If an OS looked as tasty as a fresh crayon right out of the box, it wouldn't matter if it didn't work correctly.

I'll silently put this here as I think there is strong points in this and some weaker, others are just rants. But still a different perspective : https://medium.com/@probonopd/make-it-simple-linux-desktop-usability-part-1-5fa0fb369b42
First "thank you" for sending me the article: I had NO IDEA you could right click on the hamburger button in Firefox and get the menu back. I was still hitting Alt to get it.

I'm still reading the article! Thanks for sharing it!

You can install Timeshift or Back in Time. I use Timeshift to backup my system. It is in the Pop repo so installs via apt.
I.. Was not aware of the existence of ANY of this! :D Looks fantastic! Thanks for the heads up!
 

SteveM

New member
Aug 24, 2019
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You can install Timeshift or Back in Time. I use Timeshift to backup my system. It is in the Pop repo so installs via apt.
For some reason I thought I had read that Timeshift excluded user data in /home, but I see now that isn't the case. Thanks, I'll have to give it a try.

That's a really good point - usability for the average Joe. I've had similar problems with sleep functions on laptops using this distro or that. Before I bought this System76 computer I'm typing on now, I bought a brand spanking new Lenovo with a shiny new Ryzen. I bought it for IT work at the job I was on and installed Kali. It.. Was a job to say the least. I finally got everything to work except the mouse and didn't bother with the touch screen. It took days to get it usable. Things like that are fun for me, but I imagine endlessly frustrating for others.
It turns out that the ethernet not working after suspend is due to the hardware not correctly implementing MSI so I'm working to get the sky2 driver to blacklist my motherboard. In the mean time it is easy for a technically inclined person to pass pci=nomsi or sky2.disable_msi=1 to grub to have the same effect. This is not something that would be faced by someone purchasing from a company such as System76.

I've also tried Pop!_OS 19.04 on this system since my previous post and was happy to see that the video card drivers worked from the get go and the store was very nice. But I had a new bug, the mouse scroll wheel barely registered a single line of movement on the screen for every complete revolution of the wheel. It is a linux 5.x bug so Pop!_OS 19.04 using 5.0 means a lot of people with wireless mice are going to potentially have that problem. All of the other distros I've tried are still on 4.x so I hadn't run into it yet.

I've also discovered that while the LibreOffice buttons in macOS are not very colorful, on Debian and Pop!_OS they were very bright and colorful.

Now I just need to find an easier way to come out of suspend than digging around inside the cabinet where for case is hidden to find the power switch.
 
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derpOmattic

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For some reason I thought I had read that Timeshift excluded user data in /home, but I see now that isn't the case. Thanks, I'll have to give it a try.
If you select /home to be backed up it will do it, but if you need to use the restore function it won't include it. They explain on Timeshift's site that it restores system files, so you won't lose any personal files you've changed since last back up. If necessary, you can copy your /home data back manually.
 

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